Why Aerial Imagery Resolution Matters

Aerial Imagery

Nearmap VP of field operations, Sanchit Agarwal, touts the benefits of high-resolution aerial maps for visual analysis.

Most are enamored with Alexa, Siri, and Google Assistant—and why not? They’re always on and provide answers to our pressing questions whenever we want. But, few of us take time to appreciate the wonder of artificial intelligence. Advanced computing logic is impressive by itself, but so is the mind-boggling amount of deep data it analyzes. In fact, one could argue that advanced algorithms mean nothing without current, high-quality, relevant data. Mapping tools that aim to help users understand a location without actually being there are no different. They depend on high-definition aerial imagery that shows current, clear ground conditions in order to produce meaningful insights.

In Earth Imaging Journal’s article entitled “Why Aerial Imagery Resolution Matters,” Nearmap vice president of field operations, Sanchit Agarwal, explains how new forms of HD aerial maps are transforming the way professionals across many industries work:

“Today, with easy access to scalable high definition mapping content, anyone can utilize the power of maps in applications that extend far beyond directions and navigation. There are two essential attributes of aerial maps driving this transformation – image resolution, and model density. Today, most users are applying low-resolution satellite images that lack the detail needed for accurate decisions. But as resolution increases, the imagery becomes more detailed, the visualizations, more vivid. Ground features have gone from fuzzy satellite photos to clearly identifiable homes, buildings, roads, lakes and more – all captured using powerful cameras that have found the perfect pixel. With high-resolution comes added benefit.

With high-resolution imagery comes the ability to model reality creating real-life visualizations available for engineers, planners, construction teams and others. These models of landscapes, cities and neighborhoods are portrayed inside design tools and mapping systems saving the analyst countless days of traveling to the site.”

Read the full article on Earth Imaging Journal.

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